Comments that we have been invited to share publicly are below:


June 23, 2020
Comment: When a white female peer (graduate student) makes commentary in your presence about how she "doesn't trust you" or "really does not care about diversity". When you tell your advisor he tells you how great she was in the field and you should try to move past it and be friend because you are going to need a job one day.
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Membership status: Non-member


June 20, 2020
Before we can deal with racism effectively as a nation, we need to include educating the youth at an early age, and follow up with more sophisticated scientific explanations  and discussions progressing through the grades.  The concept of "race" is often confusing to kids, and often adopt  what their parents' attitudes towards the racial issues are.  Most schools don't deal with the scientific and anthropological aspects of "race" or "colored people".  
I'm a retired teacher with 36 years of experience in First through Eleventh Grades and hold two CA teaching credentials, a Masters in Education, and Special Ed. training including other licenses.  Consistently, students from Second through Ninth grades have asked me "Why are people different colors?" Initially,  I grabbed my UCSB Physical Anthropology's text and dug for answers (era 1966).  After checking that information on adaptation,  melanin, vitamin D, tilt and rotation of the Earth and amount of sun exposure in each latitude, one  class and I wrote a play about why early people needed different amounts of melanin to protect against skin cancer, this being dependent on their solar exposure encountered at their location on the globe.  We included the need for vitamin D and how less was created in the skin as people were located further from the Equator.  A typical 2nd grader won't make it through lessons on such material, and that's why we wrote the play.   After seeing the play, questions about sunburn, tanning, freckles, fewer sunburns with darker skins were discussed.  Finally, discussions concerning adaptations began. Then, we worked with middle school aged kids about adaptations that led to "races".
An informed youth will be the foundation on which ingrained racism can be, and should be eradicated.
Tim Gearhart
Paso Robles, CA
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June 10, 2020
Comment: Mentor your students. That doesn't mean reading lists or "to do, check back with me" lists. One on one (over zoom) sit down and show them how to download that R package and use it, point out morphology you see and why's interesting, walk through that manuscript with them verbally as they ask questions!! Commit weekly face time to your grad students on Zoom and figure out how to turn your screen share on.
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Membership status: Student member


June 10, 2020
Comment: To lower the barrier for entry we need to offer widespread financial support to students making field work experience (which is typically a requirement for graduate school) a viable summer option for those who cannot afford to work for free or to not generate income for months at time.
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Membership status: Regular member

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