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Tenth Annual Forensic Anthropology Field School in Albania, Greece, and Romania

by Ed Hagen last modified Mar 11, 2013 12:46 AM
May 21-June 14, 2013. Albania’s magnificent archaeological site at Butrint National Park is the primary location for Utica College’s tenth annual Forensic Anthropology Field School course, which also includes visits to the Acropolis in Athens as well as Dracula’s Castle and his birthplace in Transylvania. The field school is open to non-credit participants; no previous experience is required. Undergraduates and graduate students may enroll for six credits at either level.


The course emphasizes practical techniques of forensic analyses and paleopathological diagnosis using human remains from numerous locations spanning over 3,000 years.  More than 115 students from 47 different schools have participated in the course since 2004, including 10 who have made their first professional presentations at the AAFS and AAPA conferences based on their field school research projects.

Co-taught by a forensic anthropologist (Thomas A. Crist, Ph.D.) and a medical anthropologist (John H. Johnsen, Ph.D.), course topics also include cross-cultural health and healing; Balkan history and society; mortuary archaeology; cultural resources management; and heritage tourism.

For more information, please visit our webpage at www.utica.edu/butrint or contact Thomas A. Crist, Professor of Anatomy and Anthropology, at Tcrist@utica.edu/315-792-3390.

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