To register for this workshop click here. The registration deadline is March 15, 2019.


Amira-Avizo Software for Physical Anthropology.  Day/Time: Wed, March 27, 1PM-5PM; Description: Extract meaning from your image data in a half-day hands-on workshop for Thermo Scientific’s Amira-Avizo Software. Organizers: Alex Hall, Thermo Fisher Scientific ([email protected]), Germain Siraudin, Thermo Fisher Scientific ([email protected]).  Pre-registration Required

Description: This half-day workshop consists of a presentation and hands-on exercises intended for new and existing users of Thermo Scientific  Amira-Avizo Software.

Amira-Avizo 3D software provides a comprehensive, multimodal digital lab for quickly visualizing and segmenting complex anthropological specimens and artifacts. Researchers can automate segmentation workflows on image data in batch and export beautiful animations and statistics.

The workshop will highlight the important features and unique functionalities of Amira-Avizo Software for Physical Anthropology such as:

  • Data visualization
  • Image processing to enhance contrast
  • Automated segmentation
  • Meshing for FE modeling
  • Presentation and animation


After a presentation on Amira-Avizo Software, attendees will have the opportunity to ask questions, see live demonstrations, and use the software. Temporary licenses will be provided.

Participants are encouraged to bring their own data. Attendees must bring their own PC with suitable 3D graphics card for course participation.

Please read system requirements: https://www.fei-software-center.com/support/amira-avizo-system-requirements/

Information about software distribution, system requirements and installation will be e-mailed approximately one week prior to the workshop.

 

Audience: Any scientist working with imaging data, such as computed tomography, MRI, light microscopy or electron microscopy. Students, PIs, and others are welcome.


 

Copyright © 2019 American Association of Physical Anthropologists.
Site programming and administration: Ed Hagen, Department of Anthropology, Washington State University