2017

AAA-AAPA Anatomy in Anthropology Awards

Jaap Saers, University of Cambridge. “Mobility and trabecular bone variation in the human foot” (podium) Books received: Kivell TL, Lemelin P, Richmond BG, Schmitt D, editors. 2016. The Evolution of the Primate Hand. Springer. (http://www.springer.com/us/book/9781493936441) Haile-Selassie Y, Su D, editors. 2016. The Postcranial Anatomy of Australopithecus afarensis. Springer. (http://www.springer.com/us/book/9789401774277)

Carrie Mongle, SUNY Stony Brook. “The developmental cascade biases rates of evolutionary change in the dentition” (poster) Books received: Jones SC, Stewart BA. 2016. Africa from MIS 6-2. Springer. (http://www.springer.com/us/book/9789401775199) Jagers op Akkerhuis, GAJM, editor. 2016. Evolution and Transitions in Complexity. Springer. (http://www.springer.com/us/book/9783319438016)

Patricia Whitten Prize

Caitlin O’Connell, Boston University. “Examining social stress through self-directed behavior in wild orangutans” Books received: Sievert LL, Brown DE, editors. 2016. Biological Measures of Human Experience across the Lifespan. Springer. (http://www.springer.com/us/book/9783319441016) Henke W, Tattersall I, editors. 2015. Handbook of Paleoanthropology Volume 2. Springer. (http://www.springer.com/us/book/9783642399787)

Professional Development Grant

Stephen G.B. Chester, City University of New York. New Paleogene Primate Skeletons from Fossiliferous Limestones

Amanda Tan, Dartmouth College. Using stable isotopes to measure the nutritional advantages of stone-tool use by long-tailed macaques”

Michelle A. Rodrigues, University of Illinois. The biological impact of tend-and-befriend strategies: How female social relationships mediate stress in female scientists of color

Corey Ragsdale, Southern Illinois University - Edwardsville. Biological consequences of Spanish colonization in Mexico

Justin Ledogar, University of New England, Armidale, New South Wales, Australia. Evolutionary modeling of craniofacial shape and functional performance in fossil hominins and extant durophagous primates

Ashley S. Hammond, George Washington University. Hominoid-like fossils from the late Oligocene of Kenya

Jimena Barbeito Andrés, Institute Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Interpreting brain and skull phenotypic outcomes when Zika virus and undernutrition interact during early development

The Ales Hrdlicka Prize

Kristin Sabbi, University of New Mexico. “Attention to social grooming among immature East African chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) of the Kanyawara community at Kibale National Park” Book received: Reichard UH, Hirai H, Barlli C, editors. 2016. Evolution of Gibbons and Siamang. Springer. (http://www.springer.com/us/book/9781493956128)

The Charles R. Darwin Lifetime Achievement Award

Alan Walker, Pennsylvania State University. Human and primate evolution, evolutionary anatomy, behavioral inference from the fossil and taphonomic record.

The Earnest Albert Hooton Prize

Kate McGrath, George Washington University. “Quantifying linear enamel hypoplasia in Virunga mountain gorillas and other great apes” Books received: Byers SN. Introduction to Forensic Anthropology, 5th edition. (http://www.routledgetextbooks.com/textbooks/9781138188846/) Byers SN. Forensic Anthropology Laboratory Manual, 4th edition. (http://www.routledgetextbooks.com/textbooks/9781138188846/)

The Gabriel W. Lasker Service Award

John H. Relethford, SUNY Oneonta. Human population genetics, human variation, and the evolution of modern humans.

The Honorable Mention Prizes

Sam Larson, University of Pennsylvania. "An evolutionary perspective on the contribution of serotonergic genetics to health: lessons from rhesus macaques" Book received: Surviving the 21st Century. Springer, Fernandez Jalvo Y, King T, Yepiskoposyan L, Andrews P. 2016. Azokh Cave and the Transcaucasian Corridor. Springer. (http://www.springer.com/us/book/9783319249223)

Elizabeth Tinsley-Johnson, University of Michigan. "Socializing by vocalizing: A test of the vocal grooming hypothesis" Book received: Fernandez Jalvo Y, King T, Yepiskoposyan L, Andrews P. 2016. Azokh Cave and the Transcaucasian Corridor. Springer. http://www.springer.com/us/book/9783319249223), Haidle MN, Conard NJ, Bolus M, editors. 2016. The Nature of Culture. Springer. http://www.springer.com/us/book/9789401774246 )

Erin Kane. "Diana monkeys (Cercopithecus diana) experience fewer mechanical challenges during periods of low fruit availability" Books received: Henke W, Tattersall I, editors. 2015. Handbook of Paleoanthropology Volume 3. Springer. (http://www.springer.com/us/book/9783642399787), Jasienska G, Sherry DS, Holmes DJ, editors. 2017. The Arc of Life. Springer. (http://www.springer.com/us/book/9781493940363 )

Elizabeth Sawchuk, University of Toronto. "Biological continuity over the transition to food production in Eastern Africa: human dental evidence from early pastoralists" Books received: Fernandex Jalvo Y, Andrews P. 2016. Atlas of Taphonomic Identifications. Springer. (http://www.springer.com/us/book/9789401774307), Odonnabhain B, Lozada Cerna MC, editors. 2014. Archaeological Human Remains, Global Perspectives. Springer. (http://www.springer.com/us/book/9783319063690 )

Tesla Monson, University of California Berkeley. "The relationship between dental eruption sequence, phylogeny and life history in the evolution of primate dentition" Books received: Henke W, Tattersall I, editors. 2015. Handbook of Paleoanthropology Volume 1. Springer. (http://www.springer.com/us/book/9783642399787), Brinkman DB, Holroyd PA, Gardner JD, editors. 2013. Morphology and Evolution of Turtles. Springer. (http://www.springer.com/us/book/9789400743083 )

Dominique Bertrand, University at Buffalo, SUNY. "Testing a novel method for collecting salivary cortisol from wild macaques" Book received: Shively CA, Wilson ME, editors. 2016. Social Inequalities in Health in Nonhuman Primates. Springer. (http://www.springer.com/us/book/9783319308708 )

The Juan Comas Prize

Amy Scott, Boston University. “Are male orangutans a threat to infants? Mother-offspring interactions with males in wild Pongo pygmaeus wurmbii” Book received: Diogo R. 2017. Evolution Driven by Organismal Behavior. Springer. (http://www.springer.com/us/book/9783319475806)

The Mildred Trotter Prize

Kathleen Paul, Arizona State University. “Comparative performance of deciduous and permanent dental morphology in reconstructing biological kinship” Books received: Cucina A, editor. Archaeology and Bioarchaeology of Population Movement among the Prehispanic Maya. Springer. (http://www.springer.com/us/book/9783319108575) Marom A, Hovers E, editors. 2017. Human Paleontology and Prehistory. Springer. (http://www.springer.com/us/book/9783319466446)

The Sherwood Washburn Prize

Amy Goldberg, Stanford University. “Neolithic familial migration contrasts Bronze Age male migration inferred from ancient X chromosomes” Books received: Iovita R, Katsuhiro S, editors. 2016. Multidisciplinary Approaches to the Study of Stone Age Weaponry. Springer. (http://www.springer.com/us/book/9789401776011) Harvati K, Roksandic M, editors. 2016. Paleoanthropology of the Balkans and Anatolia. Springer. (http://www.springer.com/us/book/9789402408737) Langley MC, editor. 2016. Osseous Projectile Weaponry. Springer. (http://www.springer.com/us/book/9789402408973) Maier A. 2015. The Central European Magdalenian. Springer. (http://www.springer.com/us/book/9789401772051)

William S. Pollitzer Student Travel Award

Malorie Albee, Lucyna Bowland, Timothy Bransford, Marianne Brasil, Kristen Broehl, Margaret Bryer, Sergio Calle, Jessica Campbell, Stephanie Canington, Colleen Cheverko, Melissa Clark, Bonnie Clark, Elizabeth Clausing, Mark Clemente, Amanda Cook, Catherine Cooper, Dany Coutinho Nogueira, Randy Edward David, Matthew de Vries, Madelynne Dudas, Crystal Easley, Eleanor Farber, Allison Formanack, Maria Fox, Jessica Galea, Rebecca ilmour, Evelyn Glaze, Matthew Go, Madelyn Green, Amanda Hardie, Aliya Hoff (declined), Stella Ioannou, Hyunwoo Jung, Laura Kihlstrom, Gillian King-Bailey, Emma Lagan, Amanda Lee, Ingrid Lundeen, Kathryn Marklein, Leslie Quade, Malcolm Ramsay, Asta Rand, Brian Shearer, Samantha Stead, Elizabeth Tinsley Johnson, Jeanelle Uy, Kerryn Ashleigh Warren, Nicole Weiss, Amanda Wissler, Emma Wood..

2016

AAA-AAPA Anatomy in Anthropology Awards

Jesse Goliath, The Ohio State University. “Patterns in ontogeny of epiphyseal and metaphyseal trabecular bone microstructure in the human proximal tibia”

Eric Castillo, Harvard University. “Testing biomechanical models for lumbar lordosis variation in hominins”

Professional Development Grant

Ryan Schmidt, University of Texas, Austin. Eneolithic Trypillain genomic variability and the origins of the Cucuteni-Tripolye peoples

Stephanie Meredith, Harvard University. Do winners take all? Assessing subadult sperm competition in hamadryas baboons

Michelle Brown, University of California, Santa Barbara. Measuring the effects of feeding competition at multiple scales in a frugivorous primate community

John Starbuck, University of Central Florida. Big brains and small faces: The power of aneuploidy to elucidate mechanisms influencing human evolution and development

The Ales Hrdlicka Prize

Andrew Halley, University of California Berkeley. The embryonic origins of primate encephalization: allometric and growth analyses

The Charles R. Darwin Lifetime Achievement Award

Michael Crawford, University of Kansas. Anthropological genetics, demography, molecular genetics, primate genetics, and genetics of twins

The Earnest Albert Hooton Prize

Myra Laird, New York University. “Gape cycle kinematic variance and occlusal topography in modern humans ”

The Gabriel W. Lasker Service Award

Leslie Aiello, Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research. Human paleontology, evolution of human adaptation, evolutionary theory, life history, evolution of the brain, diet, language and cognition.

The Honorable Mention Prizes

Brittany Walter. Urbanization and Mortality Risk in Late Medieval London Books received: Bioarchaeology: Interpreting Behavior from the Human Skeleton (Larsen; Cambridge) Field Archaeology from Around the World (Carver, Gaydarska, & Montón-Subias, editors; Springer)

Melanie Beasley. Seasonal variation in rainfall at Allia Bay, Kenya 3.97 Ma Books received: Handbook of Paleoanthropology, Volumes 1-3 (Henke and Tattersall, editors; Springer)

Amanda Lee. Multivariate asymmetry in the femur as a basis for "pair-matching" Books received: Archaeological Human Remains: Global Perspectives (O’Donnabhain & Lozada, Editors; Springer) Retrograde Evolution During Major Extinction Crises (Guex; Springer)

Lu Yao. Using ancient DNA from museum specimens for phylogenetic correction to interpret island dwarfing in Macaca fascicularis Books received: The Pictorial Guide to the Living Primates (Rowe) and For the Love of Lemurs (Wright)

The Juan Comas Prize

Amber Walker-Bolton, University of Toronto. Operational sex ratio, dominance rank and mating success of group and non-group male ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta)

The Mildred Trotter Prize

Nathan Thompson, State University of New York Stonybrook. Frontal plane trunk mechanics in humans and chimpanzees, and implications for the bipedal gait of the last common ancestor

The Sherwood Washburn Prize

Cecilia Mayer, Macalester College. How tough is the grey-cheeked mangabey? Patterns of healed skeletal trauma in Lophocebus albigena

William S. Pollitzer Student Travel Award

Kathryn Allen, Amy Anderson, Samantha Archer, Jessica Beck, Jacqueline Berger, Jacqueline Berger, Jessica Bolte, Joel Bray, M. Loring Burgess, Colleen Cheverko, Sarah Duignan, Sarah Edlund, Amandine Eriksen, Katie Faillace, Elen Feuerriegel, Matthew Go, Laura Goetz, Deanna Goldstein, Alexis Goots, Nora Heidel, Genevieve Housman, Carmen Hové, Vishal Khetpal, Sandra Koch, Katherine Lacy, Maria Nieves Colon, Caitlin O’Connell, Samantha Patterson, Sarah Peacock, Rosie Pitfield, Terren Proctor, Rachel Provazza, Shelby Putt, Meagan Rubel, Ingrid Sierp (declined), Noah Simons, Rick Smith, Mary Studebaker-Reed, Alexandra Uhl, Mary Wilkins, Alexa Wimberly, and Allysha Winburn..

2015

AAA-AAPA Anatomy in Anthropology Awards

Zachariah Hubbell, Ohio State University. Age-related trends in human trabecular bone connectivity at the cortical-trabecular interface in the proximal tibial metaphysis

Ian George, University of Missouri. Mapping language networks in the human brain

Professional Development Grant

Sharon Kessler, McGill University. Mouse lemurs as potential sentinels and reservoirs of diseases

Marin Pilloud, University of Nevada Reno. Dental phenotypic variation in Neolithic Anatolia: identifying social structure and population movement in early farming societies

Davide Ponzi, University of Chicago. Role of Puberty in the Development of Chronotype in a Rural Caribbean Community

Christopher Shaffer, Grand Valley State University. Ethnoprimatology of the Konashen community owned conservation concession, Guyana

Elizabeth Quinn, Washington University. I breastfeed, therefore I aam

The Ales Hrdlicka Prize

Eleanor Dove, Liverpool John Moores University. A (w)hole new idea: Using nutrient foramen location to identify relative growth and the center of ossification in juvenile tibiae

The Charles R. Darwin Lifetime Achievement Award

Phyllis Dolhinow, UC Berkeley. Physical anthropology, primate social behavior, ecology, development, human behavior and evolution

The Earnest Albert Hooton Prize

James Herrera, Stony Brook University. Environmental instability and functional traits explain lemur ecological community structure

The Gabriel W. Lasker Service Award

Dennis O'Rourke, University of Utah. Ancient DNA analysis, Human Population and Genetics, North American Arctic

The Juan Comas Prize

Michael Granatosky, Duke University. Kinetics of below branch quadrupedal walking in primates and other mammals: implications for the evolution of specialized suspensory locomotion

The Mildred Trotter Prize

Mary Cole, Ohio State University. A semi-automatic method for intracortical porosity quantification with application to intraskeletal variability

The Sherwood Washburn Prize

Maryjka Blaszczyk, NYU. Boldness in wild vervet monkeys: individual differences and consistency across contexts

William S. Pollitzer Student Travel Award

Julia Arenson, Joel Bray, Loring Burgess, Maria Darr, April Dobbs, Pedro Fernandez, Rebecca Gilmour, Jesse Goliath, Kevin Knowles, Elaine Kozma, Myra Laird, Amanda Lee, Lydia Light, Brian Padgett, Smanatha Patterson, Jeffrey Peterson, Kristen Ramirez, Malcolm Ramsay, Megan Rue, Christina Stantis, Marissa Stewart, Sarah Traynor, Lu Yao, and Samantha Yaussy..

2014

Professional Development Grant

J. Malukiewicz, Federal University of Minas Gerais. Next generation divergence genomics of Callithrix flaviceps, C. geoffroyi and their hybrids

N. Hawley, Brown University. Influence of infant growth on body size and blood pressure at age 6/7 in American Samoa

J. Teichroeb, Duke University. Angolan colobus (Colobus angolensis ruwenzorii) supertroops: do these represent multilevel societies driven by ecological factors?

S. Tecot, University of Arizona. Evolved hormonal mechanisms of allomaternal care behavior in red-bellied lemurs, Eulemur rubriventer

C. Kirchhoff, University of North Texas. Are skeletal trauma patterns affected by sociality? An interspecific study

E. Miller, University of South Florida. The feeding ecology of infant immune function in the United States

The Ales Hrdlicka Prize

Amy Baurenfeind, George Washington University. Differential gene and protein expression in the human and chimpanzee brain: A comparison using high-throughput techniques (with E.J. Soderblom, M.E. Turner, A.M. Moseley, J.J. Ely, P.R. Hof, C.C. Sherwood, G.A. Wray, and C.C. Babbitt)

The Charles R. Darwin Lifetime Achievement Award

Russell Tuttle, The University of Chicago. Primate morphologist, and paleoanthropology

The Earnest Albert Hooton Prize

Sarah Lacy, Washington University. Periodontal disease and health in western Eurasian Late Pleistocene humans

The Gabriel W. Lasker Service Award

Trudy R. Turner, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Molecular anthropology and evolution; Life history of non-human primates.

The Juan Comas Prize

Stephanie Schnorr, Max Planck Institute. Assessing diet specialization of Hadza microbiota through activity and composition (with K. Venema, A.N. Crittenden, F. Marlow, and A.G. Henry)

The Mildred Trotter Prize

E. Susanne Daly and K. K. Catlett, Arizona State University. A test of the inhibitory cascade (IC) model on primate deciduous premolars

The Sherwood Washburn Prize

Sandra Winters, New York University. Primate camouflage as seen by felids, raptors, and conspecifics (with J.M. Kamilar, T.H. Webster, B.J. Bradley, and J.P. Higham)

William S. Pollitzer Student Travel Award

Kathryn Allen, Claudia Astorino, Jess Beck, Richard Brel, Laura Cirillo, Mary Cole, Kim Congdon, Shaliegh Diaz-Ryder, Erin Dineen, Hallie Edmonds, Jennifer Eyre, Adam Foster, Theresa Gildner, Halszka Glowacka, Alia Gurtov, Nicholas Holowka, Stephen Johnson, Rob'yn Johnson, Addison Kemp, Holly Kiang, Marc Kissel, Tom Kraft, Sharon Kuo, Anne Kwiatt, Sam Larson, Justin Ledogar, Ellis Locke, Elizabeth LoPresti, Emily Middleton, Selin Nugent, Sean Prall, Kelsey Pugh, Joshua Robinson, John Rowen, Elizabeth Sawchuk, Jill Scott, Jess Senjem, Darcy Shapiro (declined), Eric Shattuck, Brian Shearer, Amanda Spriggs, Nicole Squyres, Laura Stroik, Sarah Swartz, Rob Tennyson, Nathan Thompson, Miranda Utzinger, Ziyu Wang, Gabriel Yapuncich, and Madeline Zhu.

2013

Professional Development Grant

Dr. Lynn Copes, Quinnipiac University. Skeletal robusticity in sooty mangabeys (Cercocebus atys): interactions among bone shape, density and mechanical performance

Dr. Abigail Bigham, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Functional consequences of EGLN1 genetic variation in high-altitude Andeans and Tibetans

Dr. Sergio Almécija, Stony Brook University. The 3D shape and function of Miocene ape and early hominin hands and feet

Dr. Kristi Lewton, Harvard University. Morphological integration and the evolvability of the mammalian pelvis: implications for primate evolution

Dr. Lesley Gregoricka, University of South Alabama. Negotiating identity in prehistoric semi-nomadic societies: a biogeochemical assessment of residential mobility in Bronze Age Oman

Dr. Chris Gilbert, Hunter College, CUNY. Skeletal analysis of the Lesula

Dr. Janine Chalk, Duke University. Age-related differences in nutrient intake and energy balance in wild Brown capuchins

Dr. Siobhan Cooke, Northeastern Illinois University. Primate paleontology in the Dominican Republic

The Ales Hrdlicka Prize

Julia Maki, Washington University. Skeletal estimates of upper limb effective mechanical advantage do not predict joint strength or speed in living humans

The Charles R. Darwin Lifetime Achievement Award

Roberto Frisancho, University of Michigan. Human adaptation to extreme environments such as high altitudes, growth, anthropometry and evaluation of nutritional status

The Earnest Albert Hooton Prize

Angela Clark, University of Otago. Sexual dimorphism and health in prehistoric Thailand (with Nancy Tayles and Siȃn E. Halcrow)

The Gabriel W. Lasker Service Award

Fred H. Smith, Illinois State University. Fred H. Smith is a human paleontologist who studies Neandertals and their relationships to modern humans.

The Juan Comas Prize

Lydia Beaudrot, University of California Davis. Correlates of dispersal limitation in African mammal communities (with Jason M. Kamila and Kaye E. Reed)

The Mildred Trotter Prize

Gabrielle A. Russo, University of Texas at Austin. Functional morphology of proximal caudal vertebrae in nonprehensile-tailed primates (with M. Katherine Sayr)

The Sherwood Washburn Prize

Lisa Danish, Rutgers University. “Following” in olive baboons (Papio hamadryas anubis) results in deviation from the Priority of Access Model: Consortship behavior and genetic paternity (with Anthony Di Fiore and Ryne A. Palombit)

William S. Pollitzer Student Travel Award

Kari Allen (Duke), Jeannie Bailey (U. Washington), W. Andrew Barr (UT Austin), Lydia Beaudrot (UC Davis), Ryan Campbell (SIU, Carbondale), Meadow Campbell (SIU, Carbondale), Lori Critcher (OSU), Elizabeth Daly (ASU), Noah Dunham (OSU), Hallie Edmonds (ASU), Kelsey Ellis (UT Austin), Elaine Gomez Guevara (CUNY), Nanda Grow (Texas A&M), Ashley Hammond (U. Missouri), Jessica Hartel (USC), Mauricio Hernandez (Cambridge), Nicholas Holowka (Stony Brook), Aimee Huard, (U. New England), Zachariah Hubbell (OSU), Jessica Joganic (Washington U.), Rob’yn Johnston (U. Missouri), Marc Kissel (U. Wisconsin), Anne Kwiatt (UT San Antonio), Sarah Lacy (Washington University, St. Louis), Catherine Merritt (U. Toronto), Justyna Miszkiewicz (U. Kent), Thierra Nalley (ASU), Allison Nesbitt (Stony Brook), Christina Nicholas (U. Iowa), Natalie O'Shea (U. Iowa), Tiffany Pan (U. Washington), Sean Prall (Indiana U.), Thomas Cody Prang (NYU), Joshua Sadvari (OSU), Jill Scott (U. Iowa), Michala Stock (NYU), Sarah Swartz (U. Missouri), Zack Throckmorton (U. Wisconsin), Willa Trask (Texas A&M), Jessica Walker (U. Pittsburgh), Raining Wang (U. Washington), Shasta Webb (Macalester College), Taylor Yuzwa (Mercyhurst)..

2012

Professional Development Grant

Biren Patel, Stony Brook University. Primate evolution and biogeography in the Lower Siwaliks of India

Sharon DeWitte, University of South Carolina. Paleoepidemiology of historic plague epidemics: the dynamics of an ancient emerging disease

Varsha Pilbrow, University of Melbourne. The physical anthropology of the 2200 BC – 600 AD humans from Samtavro in the Caucasus region of Georgia

Cynthia Thompson, Northeast Ohio Medical University. Development of non-invasive methods for studying the hormonal regulation of feeding behavior in wild primates

Claire Terhune, Duke University Medical School. Were Neanderthals biting off more than they could chew? Evidence from the temporomandibular joint of Middle and Late Pleistocene hominins

James London, University of Colorado-Boulder. New directions in early South African hominin dietary ecology

The Ales Hrdlicka Prize

Neil T. Roach, Harvard University. ‘‘Derived anatomy of the shoulder and wrist enable throwing ability in Homo.’’(with co-author DE Lieberman)

The Charles R. Darwin Lifetime Achievement Award

Clifford Jolly, New York University. Cliff ’s contributions to primate biology, behavior, ecology, and evolution have over his career helped define numerous aspects of the fields of primatology and animal behavior.

The Earnest Albert Hooton Prize

Ashley S. Hammond. ‘‘Precision and accuracy of acetabular size measures in fragmentary Plio-Pleistocene hominin pelves obtained using digital sphere-fitting techniques.’’ (with co-authors JM Plavcan and CM Ward)

The Gabriel W. Lasker Service Award

Eugenie C. Scott, National Center for Science Education. Through her position with the National Center for Science Education, Eugenie has been a tireless advocate protecting the rights of students to a quality scientific education.

The Juan Comas Prize

Heather M. Garvin, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. ‘‘The effects of living conditions on human cranial and postcranial sexual dimorphism.’’

The Mildred Trotter Prize

Zachary D. Cofran, University of Michigan. ‘‘Mandibular growth in Australopithecus robustus: a computational approach.’’

The Sherwood Washburn Prize

Christopher A. Shaffer, Washington University-St. Louis. ‘‘GIS analysis of the ranging behavior, group cohesiveness, and patch use of bearded sakis (Chiropotes sagulatus) in the Upper Essequibo Conservation Concession, Guyana.’’

William S. Pollitzer Student Travel Award

Heidi Bauer-Clapp, Michael Berthaume, Jennifer Byrens, Keely B. Carlson, Colleen Cheverko, Jonathan Brent Clayton, Caitlin Dardenne, Ileana Diaz, Adam Foster, Tegan Gaetano, Heather Garvin, Ashley Gosselin-Ildari, Lesley Gregorika, Elaine Go´mez Guevara, Amber Heard-Booth, Nicholas Holowka, Genevieve Housman, Zachariah R. Hubbell, Margaux Finn Keller, Michael Kenyhercz, Sharon Kessler, Amy Klegarth, Anne C. Kwiatt, Cadell Last, Shayna Liberman, Annick McIntosh, Georgia Milward, Justyna Miszkiewicz, Teague O’Mara, Daniel M. Parker, Sean Prall, Matthew C.S. Reid, Laurie Reitsema, Michelle A. Rodrigues, Annette Rodriguez, Aaron Sams, Eric Shattuck, Brittany Singletary, Amanda Spriggs, Nathan Edward Thompson, Zachary John Throckmorton, Carrie Veilleux, and Vivek Venkataraman..

2011

Professional Development Grant

Dr. Marta Alfonso-Durruty, University of Pennsylvania. Co-occurrence of Porotic Hyperostosis and Spina Bifida Occulta among High-Latitude Hunter Gatherers.

Dr. Paula N. Gonzalez, University of Calgary. Developmental Plasticity in the Skull: Effects of Prenatal Stress on Morphological and Genetic Traits.

Dr. Marina B. Blanco, University of Massachusetts, Amherst. First Assessment of Minimum Life Span in Wild Dwarf Lemurs by Dental Topographic Analysis.

Dr. Phillip E. Melton, Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research. Reconstruction of Migration Patterns in Mennonite Communities Using Molecular Markers: Y-chromosome Perspective

Dr. Seth D. Dobson, Dartmouth College. Co-evolution of Facial Expression, Visual Specialization, and Brain Size in Anthropoid Primates

Dr. Jacqueline T. Eng, Western Michigan University. Nomads and the Steppe Empires of Mongolia: A Bioarchaeological Perspective

The Ales Hrdlicka Prize

Cara Ocobock, Washington University in St. Louis. ‘‘Daily energy expenditure in highly active humans in a natural temperate environment.’’

The Charles R. Darwin Lifetime Achievement Award

Milford Wolpoff, University of Michigan. While lots of paleoanthropologists focus on a particular time period, taxon or body part, Milford’s strength is that he has worked on an astonishing array of topics from the very beginning of our evolution from Australopithecus, to the origin of Homo, middle Pleistocene Homo, Neandertals and the origin of modern humans.

The Earnest Albert Hooton Prize

Vanessa Hale, Purdue University School of Veterinary Medicine. ‘‘Evaluation of methods for preserving fecal microbial DNA from the spider monkey.’’

The Gabriel W. Lasker Service Award

Mark Weiss, National Science Foundation. Mark’s experience and influence has been invaluable in growing the funding base and opportunities for physical anthropologists by assuring that new competition announcements were inclusive of physical anthropologists.

The Juan Comas Prize

Richard Bender, University of Colorado, Boulder.. Stable isotopes (13C and 15N) track socioeconomic differences among urban Colombian women.

The Mildred Trotter Prize

Amber Heard-Booth, University of Texas at Austin. ‘‘Eye size and locomotion: A test of Leuckart’s Law in mammals.’’

The Sherwood Washburn Prize

M. Teague O’Mara, Arizona State University School of Human Evolution and Social Change. ‘‘The ontogeny of feeding ecology in ring-tailed lemurs.’’

William S. Pollitzer Student Travel Award

Andrea Baden, Claire Barrett, Michael Berthaume, Nicole Burt, John Crandall, Ileana Diaz, Heather Garvin, Jan F. Gogarten, Lesley Gregoricka, Nanda Grow, Lauren Halenar, Nicholas Holowka, Zachariah R. Hubbell, Gail Hughes-Morey, Heather Jarrell, Sam Kemmis, Alexandra Klales, Alicia Krzton, Sarah Lacy, Denise K. Liberton, Sara Kane Lynch, Charla Marshall, Jaime Mata-Miguez, Monica McDonald, Stephanie Meredith, Emily Middleton, Thierra K. Nalley, Emma Nelson, Teague O’Mara, Daniel Parker, Chris Percival, Laurie Reitsema, Joshua Robinson, Elizabeth Rowing, Aaron Sams, John M. Starbuck, Robert Stark, Natalie Uhl, Vivek Vasi Venkataraman, Fernando Villanea, Darice Westphal, Victoria Wobber. In the age of personalized genomics, genetic ancestry testing, and medical genetic testing, do disciplines such as osteology, paleontology, primatology, human adaptation, etc., have relevance anymore for understanding modern human evolution and biology?

2010

Professional Development Grant

Dr. Julienne Rutherford, University of Illinois at Chicago. Placental morphology and physiology in relation to fetal growth and brain development in the vervet monkey (Chlorocebus aethiops).

Dr. Ömer Gökçümen, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Mass.. Copy number variation in immunity genes among the genomes of Indigenous Americans.

Dr. Doug Boyer, Stony Brook University. Evolutionary Morphology of Primates Using Digital Tooth Models

Dr. Brian Villmoare, University College, London. Morphological Integration of the Primate Masticatory Apparatus.

The Ales Hrdlicka Prize

Ellen Quillen, Pennsylvania State University. ‘‘Using Natural Selection to Identify Genes Determining Indigenous American Skin Pigmentation.’’

The Charles R. Darwin Lifetime Achievement Award

Bill Hylander, Duke University. Those of us who have had the pleasure and distinction of working with Bill have been infected with his intellectual curiosity and scientific rigor, particularly his willingness to employ novel techniques from other fields of inquiry. Through his role as the interim director of the Duke Primate Center, we owe him a debt of gratitude for helping preserve this unique institution long critical to our understanding of the behavior, ecology, conservation, and evolution of strepsirrhine primates.

The Earnest Albert Hooton Prize

Carrie C. Veilleux, University of Texas Austin. ‘‘Differential Selection for Color Vision in Two Nocturnal Folivores.’’

The Gabriel W. Lasker Service Award

Phillip Lee Walker, University of California at Santa Barbara. Perhaps best about Phil’s service to the Association was the generosity and commitment of his time and energy to see that each task was completed. He rarely turned down a request to serve his various professional organizations. He brought to all his endeavors his scientific abilities, calm demeanor, heightened sense of diplomacy, and general good humor, characteristics that continually led colleagues to seek him out for important service roles in their organizations.

The Juan Comas Prize

Daniel M. Parker, Pennsylvania State University. ‘‘An Event History Model of Dengue Fever Outbreaks in Eight Different Endemic Regions.’’

The Mildred Trotter Prize

Kristi L. Lewton, Arizona State University. ‘‘Pelvic Biomechanics and Locomotor Adaptation Within the Order Primates.’’

The Sherwood Washburn Prize

Wendy M. Erb, Stony Brook University. ‘‘Do Loud Calls Reflect Energy Status in Male Simakobu Monkeys (Simias concolor).’’

William S. Pollitzer Student Travel Award

Bridgett Alex, Harvard University; Claire Barrett, University of Kent; Mary Blair, Columbia University; Ryan Campbell, Southern Illinois University; Jennifer Danzy-Cramer, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee; Caitlin Dardenne, University of Utah; Jessica Drew, Florida Atlantic University; Heather Garvin, Johns Hopkins University; Christopher Golias, University of Pennsylvania; Lesley Gregorika, Ohio State University; Emily Hammerl, University at Buffalo-SUNY; Kristi Lewton, Arizona State University; Denise Liberton, Pennsylvania State University; Sara Lynch, University at Buffalo-SUNY; Stephanie Meredith, Arizona State University; Christina Nicolas, University of Iowa; Aidan Ruth, Kent State University; Jennifer Spence, Ohio State University; Natalie Uhl, University of Illinois, Vivek Vasi Venkataraman, Stony Brook University; Anna Vick, University of Florida; Jennifer Wagner, Pennsylvania State University..

2009

Professional Development Grant

Michelle Buzon, Purdue University. A Bioarchaeological Investigation of Identity Development during Napatan State Formation.

Melissa Emery Thompson, University of New Mexico. Energetics of Lactation in Chimpanzees

Michelle Bezanson, Santa Clara College. Bringing the lab into the field: kinematics during quadrupedal walking in Cebus capucinus.

Kathryn Muldoon, Dartmouth University. Primate Extinction and Community Dynamics at a New Subfossil Site: Christmas River, Southcentral Madagascar.

Francis Kirera, National Museums of Kenya.. Recovery of New Hominin Remains from a New 1.5 Ma Site, Ileret, Northern Kenya

Denise Su, Pennsylvania State University. Paleontological and Geological Explorations in the Zhaotong Basin, Yunnan Province, China.

The Ales Hrdlicka Prize

Adam Foster, University of Arizona. Muscle force production during bent-knee, bent-hip walking in humans.

The Charles R. Darwin Lifetime Achievement Award

George J. Armelagos, Emory University. George is a four-field anthropologist who has spent his life building elegant and compelling arguments in research areas that are Darwinian in approach and practical in application. The collective sum of all of his work highlights an original thinker who has dedicated himself to his craft and to his students.

The Earnest Albert Hooton Prize

David Green, George Washington University. Factors contributing to hominoid shoulder morphology: muscle size, ontogeny, and behavior.

The Gabriel W. Lasker Service Award

Curtis Weinker, University of South Florida. Since 1972 at the University of South Florida, where Weinker was a professor in the anthropology department and held a joint appointment with the College of Medicine, he served as the: Associate Dean for Academic Programs, Coordinator of Undergraduate Student Affairs, Associate (Interim) Dean for Graduate Affairs, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, and Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies. Just a few of his many honors there included Outstanding Faculty Member, the USF President’s Distinguished Service Award, and the USF President’s Distinguished Affirmative Action Award. He is currently emeritus professor at South Florida. By the time he retired in 2003, he had published more than 70 articles and a book.

The Juan Comas Prize

Lynn Copes, Institute of Human Origins, Arizona State University. How and Why Do Humans Grow Thin Skulls? A Test of the Systemic Robusticity Hypothesis.

The Mildred Trotter Prize

Olga Panagiotopoulou, Hull York Medical School, University of York, UK. Testing the adaptive significance of the catarrhine symphysis using Finite Element Analysis (FEA).

The Sherwood Washburn Prize

Amy Lu, Stony Brook University. Natural birth control: seasonal increases in fecalprogestins affect reproductive function in wild female Phayre’s leaf monkeys (Trachypithecus phayrei).

William S. Pollitzer Student Travel Award

Mark Beary, University of Missouri; Jessica Brinkworth, City University of New York; Ryan Campbell, Southern Illinois University; Stephanie Child, University of Missouri; Lynn Copes, Arizona State University; James Cray, University of Pittsburgh; Kathryn Driscoll, University of Tennessee; Heather Garvin, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine; Lesley Gregoricka, Ohio State University; Nanda Grow, Texas A&M University; Emily Hammerl, University of Buffalo; Heather Hassel, Stony Brook University; Mary Kelaita, University of Michigan; Cassandra Koontz, Vanderbilt University; Britney Kyle, Ohio State University; Sarah Lacy, Washington University in St. Louis; Denise Liberton, Pennsylvania State University; Sara Lynch, University of Buffalo; Tracie McKinney, Ohio State University; Rachel Menegaz, University of Missouri; Katie Miller, Arizona State University; David Pappano, University of Michigan; Eleanna Prevedorou, Arizona State University; Ellen Quillen, Pennsylvania State University; Terrence Ritzman, Arizona State University; Elizabeth Rowe, Temple University; Anna Vick, University of Florida; Leslie Williams, Ohio State University..

2008

The Ales Hrdlicka Prize

Meghan M. Moran, Kent State University. ‘‘Walkers vs. non-walkers: a comparison of femoral neck cortical bone in humans.’’ (Coauthors: C.E. Hilton and B.G. Richmond.)

The Charles R. Darwin Lifetime Achievement Award

Jane E. Buikstra, Arizona State University. Buikstra has made major contributions in paleopathology, forensic anthropology and more generally within physical anthropology and archaeology.

The Earnest Albert Hooton Prize

Nicole Griffin, George Washington University. ‘‘Comparative in vivo forefoot kinematics in extant hominids.’’ (Coauthors: K. D’Aouˆ t, P. Aerts, B.G. Richmond.)

The Gabriel W. Lasker Service Award

Clark Spencer Larson, Ohio State University. In Clark’s long service to the AAPA he has served on the Program Committee and on the Editorial Board of the AJPA, as a Local Arrangements meeting co-chair, as AAPA Vice President and President, and as Editor of the AJPA. There are few who have given more service to the association.

The Juan Comas Prize

Heather Hassel, Stony Brook University. ‘‘How reliable are density estimates in diurnal primates?’’ (Coauthors: C. Borries, E. Larney, M. Umopanjan, and A. Koenig).

The Mildred Trotter Prize

R. A. Menegaz, University of Missouri. ‘‘Loaded and spaced out: plasticity and function of the palate in rabbits, with implications for australopith facial form.’’ (Coauthors: S. V. Sublett, S. D. Figueroa, T. J. Hoffman, and M. J. Ravosa.)

The Sherwood Washburn Prize

Joseph Orkin, Washington University. ‘‘Is primate-like grasping needed for fine branch feeding? Terminal branch use in eastern gray squirrels Sciurus carolinlensis.’’ (Coauthor: H. Pontzer).

William S. Pollitzer Student Travel Award

Wendy Black, University of Cape Town; Tafline Crawford, Wash. University; Jessica Joganic, Arizona State University; Lisa Pulliam, Western Oregon University; Jill Scott, University of Iowa; Melisa Kiyamu Tsuchiya, University of Albany; Meghan Healy, University of New Mexico; Elisabeth Nicholson, Northwestern University.

2007

The Ales Hrdlicka Prize

Valerie Andrushko, University of California, Santa Barbara. ‘‘Strontium isotope evidence for prehistoric migration in the valley of Cuszco, Peru.’’ (Coauthors M.R. Buzon, A Sinometti and R.A. Creaser).

The Charles R. Darwin Lifetime Achievement Award

Michael Little, Binghamton University. Early in his career, Little began making major contributions to the study of pastoral societies using ecological and evolutionary principles. Little has been a major participant in and has had a major impact on international science programs over the past 40 years, including the International Biological Program (IBP) and the Man and the Biosphere Program (MAB).

The Earnest Albert Hooton Prize

Erin Leslie, Northwestern University. ‘‘A comparative analysis of internal cranial anatomy in the Hylobatidae.’’

The Gabriel W. Lasker Service Award

Martin K. Nickels, Illinois State University. Martin K. (Marty) Nickels is Professor Emeritus of Anthropology at Illinois State University, where he has been recognized for excellence in teaching on numerous occasions. While he has many publications that are ‘‘traditional’’ for a physical anthropologist, much of his writing has been directed at teachers and the injection of human evolution and other physical anthropological subjects into the science curricula of schools.

The Juan Comas Prize

Maria Serrat, Kent State University. ‘‘Effects of rearing temperature on long bone growth in mice: An experimental model for examining Allen’s Rule.’’

The Mildred Trotter Prize

Christopher Gilbert, Stony Brook University. ‘‘Cranio-mandibular morphology supporting the molecular African papionin clades and the identification of Cercocebus antiquus.’’

The Sherwood Washburn Prize

Campbell Rolian, Harvard University. ‘‘Walking, running and the evolution of short toes in humans.’’ (Coauthors: D.E. Lieberman, J.W. Scott, and J. Hamill).

William S. Pollitzer Student Travel Award

Robert Omalley, University of Southern California; Susan Landers Roberts, University of Colorado; Amy Farnbach, Arizona State University; Elizabeth diGangi, University of Tennessee; Rebecca Gray, University of Florida; Kristin Young, University of Kansas..

2006

The Ales Hrdlicka Prize

Herman Pontzer, Harvard University. "The evolution of hominin locomotor performance and the emergence of Homo."

The Charles R. Darwin Lifetime Achievement Award

C. Loring Brace, University of Michigan. Brace is a prolific scholar who has authored an enormous number of books, peer-reviewed articles, and other contributions. He is also a favored presenter at professional meetings who frequently salts his talks with limericks written by his alter ego – I.Wright Drivell.

The Earnest Albert Hooton Prize

Kristin Harper, Emory University. "The origin of syphilis: a phylogenetic approach suggesting NewWorld origin."

The Gabriel W. Lasker Service Award

Fred de Kuyper, AAPA. The AAPA recognized Fred de Kuyper's counsel in negotiating a new publishing agreement between the association and John Wiley & Sons, the publisher of AJPA, thereby making a lasting contribution to the health, wellbeing, and future of the AAPA association and its journal.

The Juan Comas Prize

Brian Kemp, University of California at Davis. "Timing of the peopling of the Americas: genetic analysis of early Holocene skeletal remains."

The Mildred Trotter Prize

Jason Organ, Johns Hopkins University. "To grasp or not to grasp? Structure and function of platyrrhine caudal vertebrae."

The Sherwood Washburn Prize

Jandy Hanna, Duke University. "Locomotor energetics in primates: vertical compared to estimated horizontal costs."

William S. Pollitzer Student Travel Award

Omer Gokcumen, University of Pennsylvania.

2005

The Charles R. Darwin Lifetime Achievement Award

Eugene Giles, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. From his earliest publications, Gene has been at the cutting edge of key developments in, or affecting, biological anthropology. Gene’s breadth and depth in physical anthropology, his eclectic skills and interests, reveal him to be a generalist, one of a kind that we may never see again.

2004

The Charles R. Darwin Lifetime Achievement Award

Robert R. Sokal, Stony Brook University. Bob’s vita is exceptionally impressive. He has published over 200 papers and has also co-authored three very influential books: Biometry, Principles of Numerical Taxonomy, and Numerical Taxonomy. Bob’s research has spanned a wide range of topics and organisms. He has written on subjects ranging from the genetics of insecticide resistance to the ecological genetics of houseflies. He is perhaps best known for his many works on numerical taxonomy, a field he co-developed with Peter Sneath.

2003

The Charles R. Darwin Lifetime Achievement Award

Francis E. (Frank) Johnston, University of Pennslyvania. Turning to just one of his intellectual contributions, Frank developed a focus on biocultural interrelations that formed the basic theoretical orientation for his work and that of many of his students and of his colleagues. Over the next decade, the biocultural approach became one of the most important and well-used approaches in growth and development, demography, genetics, paleopathology, and so many other areas that one can hardly examine our journal without findings articles relating some aspect of biology to some aspect of the social or cultural characteristics of a population.

2002

The Charles R. Darwin Lifetime Achievement Award

Morris Goodman, Wayne State University. Through his decades of research in molecular anthropology, Morris has played a central role in reordering our view of the topology of primate evolution. In doing so, he has demonstrated the variable rates of molecular evolution among primate lineages, key among which is the trend to a slowing rate of molecular change in the anthropoids, especially the lineages leading to humans and African apes.

2001

The Charles R. Darwin Lifetime Achievement Award

Charles Oxnard. Charles Oxnard has placed his unique stamp on just about every aspect of our discipline across the entire second half of the 20th century and all around the world, beginning in England and moving westward through North America to Asia and Australia. His research accomplishments have been almost as global as his residence patterns. A glance at his long bibliography shows an amazingly diverse span of subject matter, including comparative anatomy, growth and development, bone biology, vitamin metabolism, and the patterns and causes of sexual dimorphism. But when we think of his work as a whole, what comes to the forefront is his morphometric work—his lifelong quest for finding ways of taking huge numbers of data or complicated shapes, and crunching them into simpler functions that reveal a small number of underlying patterns reflecting diet, or locomotor behavior, or phylogeny. And most of us think immediately of all the books and papers in which Charles has applied these approaches to the study of primate and human evolution.

2000

The Charles R. Darwin Lifetime Achievement Award

Elwyn Simons. Elwyn Simons began his career as a general vertebrate paleontologist, with a doctoral thesis on the Paleocene pantodonts. But he rapidly shifted the focus of his interest specifically into the primates, with a second thesis, under the distinguished direction of Wilfrid Le Gros Clark, on the Eocene primates of Europe. Since those days in the late 1950s he has gone on to become the most productive field paleoprimatologist of his generation, obtaining extraordinary fossil-finding achievements in Egypt, India, and Madagascar and other places. Through both discovery and analysis, no single individual has done more than Elwyn has to enlarge directly our knowledge of the primate evolutionary past; and his indirect contributions in this area, through the training and encouragement of others, have been equally vast.

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