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Welcome to AAPA

by Ed Hagen last modified Jun 30, 2009 04:53 PM
Physical anthropology is a biological science that deals with the adaptations, variability, and evolution of human beings and their living and fossil relatives. Because it studies human biology in the context of human culture and behavior, physical anthropology is also a social science. The AAPA is the world's leading professional organization for physical anthropologists. Formed by 83 charter members in 1930, the AAPA now has an international membership of over 1,700. The Association's annual meetings draw more than a thousand scientists and students from all over the world.

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Courses on 3D Geometric Morphometrics and Ontogeny and Geometric Morphometrics

Courses on 3D Geometric Morphometrics and Ontogeny and Geometric Morphometrics

by Ed Hagen last modified Oct 29, 2013 03:07 PM

Registration is open for the following courses, AAPA members will have a 20 % discount on the fees. - 3D GEOMETRIC MORPHOMETRICS - Fourth edition; May 20-24, 2014. Instructor: Dr. Lissa Tallman (Grand Valley State University, USA).

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Bioanthropology field school on the island of Astypalaia, Greece

Bioanthropology field school on the island of Astypalaia, Greece

by Ed Hagen last modified Oct 29, 2013 02:48 PM

The field school takes place on Astypalaia, a small, beautiful island in the Aegean Sea and part of the Dodecanese island group in Greece. It is based on a unique archaeological site – the largest ancient children’s cemetery in the world, with at least 2800 children’s burials. In the field laboratory overlooking the sea, students learn the specialist skills required to excavate, record, identify, conserve, measure and catalogue the tiny bones and teeth of young children. This is one of the few sites in the world where children’s remains are abundant enough to provide such experience. Everyone carries out all the tasks required for each burial and so gains a useful range of experience for work on human remains.

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AAPA Professional Development Grants 2014

by Ed Hagen last modified Oct 15, 2013 04:40 PM

The American Association of Physical Anthropologists recognizes that the professional development of young, talented scientists in the early stages of their careers is critical to the continued health and vitality of the discipline. To that end, the AAPA offers up to eight Professional Development Grants annually to qualified recipients, each in the amount of $5,000.

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Course: Quantitative Genetics of shape - Second edition

Course: Quantitative Genetics of shape - Second edition

by Ed Hagen last modified Sep 30, 2013 01:41 PM

February 3-6, 2014. Instructors: Dr. Neus Martínez Abadías (Centre for Genomic Regulation, Spain) and Dr. Nicolas Navarro ( École Pratique des Hautes Études, France). Place: Els Hostalets de Pierola, Barcelona, Spain. Organized by: Transmitting Science and the Council of Els Hostalets de Pierola.

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The ‘Invisible Dead’ and the Development of Early Human Beliefs about the Body

by Ed Hagen last modified Sep 25, 2013 01:29 PM

Formal disposal of the dead is widely practised today, but this has not always been the case; among prehistoric societies so few burials are encountered that it appears to have been the exception rather than the rule. When did ‘formal’ burial and cremation become generalised? What significance did this have for the development of religious belief and human self-awareness? A new project funded by the John Templeton Foundation is being undertaken by an inter-disciplinary team from Durham University. The project which started in October 2012 involves a team of specialists; Principal Investigator Chris Scarre (prehistory of western Europe) and Co-Investigators Professors Graham Philip (Levant), Charlotte Roberts (skeletal analysis) and Douglas Davies (anthropologist and theologian), as well as an international Board of Advisors. Two post-doctoral researchers are also working on the project: Dr. Jennie Bradbury (Levant) and Dr. Mandy Jay (Britain). The project aims to provide a new understanding of the emergence of religious belief and self-awareness over the past 12,000 years. It is examining archaeological data from across two regions (Britain and the Levant) in order to explore the temporal, social and economic contexts of changing relationships between human socio-religious beliefs and concepts of the body and the afterlife.

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Document Actions
American Journal of Physical Anthropology
Biological Shape Analysis. Edited by Pete E. Lestrel. Singapore: World Scientific Publishing. 2013. 215 pp. ISBN 978-981-4518-40-6. $125.00 (hardcover). Jul 31, 2014
ERRATUM: Cook, RA, Aubry, BS. (2014), Residence patterning: A study of biological variation in the late prehistoric Middle Ohio Valley. Am J Phys Anthropol. 154:270–278 . DOI: 10.1002/ajpa.22503 Jul 31, 2014
Commingled and Disarticulated Human Remains: Working Toward Improved Theory, Method, and Data. Edited by Anna J. Osterholtz, Kathryn M. Baustian, and Debra L. Martin. New York, NY: Springer. 2014. 285 pp. ISBN 978-1-4614-7560-6. $129.00 (hardcover). Jul 28, 2014
Paleomobility in the Tiwanaku Diaspora: Biogeochemical analyses at Rio Muerto, Moquegua, Peru Jul 26, 2014
An Unnatural History of Emerging Infections. Edited by Ron Barrett and George J. Armelagos. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 2013. 160 pp. ISBN 9780199608294. $59.95. Jul 25, 2014
Rereading The Fossil Record. By David Sepkoski. Chicago, IL: The University of Chicago Press. 2012. 432 pp. ISBN 13:978-0-226-74855. $50.50 (cloth). Jul 25, 2014
Kinematics and spatiotemporal parameters of infant-carrying in olive baboons Jul 25, 2014
Teeth: A Very Short Introduction. By Peter S. Ungar. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 2014. 137 pp. ISBN 978-0-19-967059-8. $11.95 (paperback). Jul 25, 2014
Health and disease: Exploring the relation between parasitic infections, child nutrition status, and markets Jul 24, 2014
The function of loud calls (Hoot Series) in wild western gorillas (Gorilla gorilla) Jul 24, 2014
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